Cultured Marble & Tyvarian

Cultured Marble & Tyvarian

Cleaning Instructions For All Man-made Products
Skilled craftsmen using premium quality materials have manufactured your cultured marble product. Our care and high standards culminate in the durable beauty of our cultured marble. You can protect the splendor of your product and ensure a long life of trouble-free service by observing a few simple procedures.
DO NOT clean this product with any abrasive material or cleanser. (i.e., steel wool, Comet, Ajax, Soft Scrub, etc.). These abrasives will dull the lustrous finish.
We recommend Gel-Gloss, a one step cleaning process, for our products. This is available at Home Depot. Spray Away is another great option.
You may choose to clean your marble with liquid cleaners such as Fantastic, Mr. Clean or Formula 409. After cleaning, wax your marble surface with a non-abrasive wax. (turtle wax) This produces a shinier surface and makes future cleaning easier.
Many problems and stains can be avoided by attention to proper use of your product. With a minimum of care, you will have many happy years to enjoy its beauty.
The following steps can be taken to remedy unusual cleaning problem.
Hard water scale and rust stains can be removed with mild vinegar solution, followed by a fine polishing compound.
Mold and mildew can be removed with a diluted solution of chlorine bleach and water or with Lysol. Never let pure bleach come in contact with your marble.
Hair dye and shoe polish can be removed by using polishing compound.
Minor surface scratches can be buffed out with polishing compound. A professional cultured marble repairman in your area should repair deeper scratches and more major problems.
Certain chemicals can seriously damage your product, even during brief periods of contact. DO NOT let your cultured marble come in contact with any of the following:
Clorox or other Hypochlorite bleaches, Hydrogen Peroxide in any concentration, Drano or other Lye solutions, Sani-Flush or other sodium bisulfate compounds, Paint strippers, Comet, Ajax or other abrasive cleaners.

If there is a deep scratch or chip, call us and we can get someone from our repair department to go there and repair it for you.

Natural Granite

Natural Granite

Sealing, Cleaning and Maintaining your Granite Countertops
Granite countertop care and maintenance comes down to just a few simple steps that will keep your granite countertops looking like new for years. Polished granite will not lose its shine and will not scratch from normal wear. Here’s how to keep that polished luster and care for your granite countertop.
How to Clean Granite Countertops
The easiest way of cleaning granite countertops is to simply use warm water and mild, phosphate-free, biodegradable liquid dish soap, preferably light-colored and containing no aromatics. This is a gentle way to clean the grease and grime from your granite counters without damaging them. If you use plain soap and water, this can lead to soap build up and over time, will dull the glossy finish of your polished granite.
After cleaning you should rinse the countertops thoroughly and dry with a cotton cloth.
Never use powdered cleansers to clean your stone as they contain pumice which is an abrasive.
Never use acidic cleaners that may include ammonia when cleaning granite countertops.
You can also buy special mild granite cleaners specifically designed for cleaning stone.

Care of Granite Countertops
Granite is extremely hard but like any natural stone, it is slightly porous. Anything acidic can etch the glossy surface and oils can soak into an unsealed top, so it’s important to quickly clean up spills like wine, oil, mustard, citrus or chemicals before they can soak into the surface or damage the gloss.
Although water left to puddle on the surface of the granite will leave a dark stain, this will disappear when it dries out completely. To be safe, we recommend sealing granite countertops to reduce absorption of oils and liquids that may stain the granite.
Our #1 piece of advice for granite countertop care is to seal your granite countertop using a natural stone sealer.
A good way to check the state of sealer on your granite surface is to sprinkle some water on your countertop. If it doesn’t bead up but soaks into the stone it needs to be re-sealed. This can be done once a year or as necessary.
Applying the granite countertop sealer is as easy as wiping it on, using a soft cotton cloth. The sealer is absorbed into the microscopic pores of the granite and is safe for food handling.
Removing Stains from Granite Countertops
If you have a stain on your granite countertop that you cannot remove you can try some of these ideas:
Marker stains can often be wiped away using acetone or lacquer thinner, especially on dark granite colors. If you have a light color granite installed you can also try hydrogen peroxide instead.
A good way to remove stubborn granite stains is to use a poultice, which will draw out the stain or oil from the granite into the poultice. Try making a mixture of dishwashing liquid and water, thickened with enough flour to make a paste. Apply this paste carefully to the stain and cover with plastic to keep it from drying out too quickly. Leave overnight and scrape away with a wooden utensil to avoid scratches.
If the granite stain is from oil, you can try the same poultice but substitute hydrogen peroxide for the dishwashing liquid in the above formula.
For stubborn oil stains try placing a hot, wet, terry cloth towel on the stain, then place an iron on full steam on top of the towel. This will help break down the stain and you can then use the poultice to draw out the oil.
Organic stains from food can be attacked by adding a few drops of ammonia to the mixture.
An quick and easy thing to try is to sprinkle cornstarch on the stain and let it sit for 18 to 24 hours. Afterwards, vacuum up the cornstarch and repeat the process as needed.

Natural Marble

Natural Marble

Protecting marble against etching and staining takes effort, but thankfully not a lot. Experts share tips on how to treat it right to ensure it will look its best for many years.
The material's porous nature makes it prone to etching and staining. Honed (matte) marble hides these little imperfections better than polished, a particularly important consideration for kitchen counters.
Seal
Sealing repels staining agents but doesn't make marble stainproof. When water no longer beads, it's time to reseal. Marble should be sealed 2 to 4 times a year depending on wear.
Protect
Vinegar, citrus, and tomato will etch marble; don't let them sit on the stone. "Use coasters and cutting boards. Wipe up spills immediately."
Clean
Avoid using acidic or abrasive cleaners.
I like Miracle Sealants tile and stone cleaner." $9 for 32 oz., homedepot.com
Clean marble stains as soon as possible.
Just like acidic cleaners, acidic “stuff” in general is bad for your marble. This includes wine, orange juice, tomatoes and even soft drinks, so get any spills up right away by blotting them – wiping or rubbing can make the problem worse. If you’re left with a stain anyway, use a commercial marble stain remover (remember to choose wisely) or make your own. Try making a poultice (a “soft, moist mass” – not just a medical term) out of a fine powder like whiting or baking soda, going for a peanut butter-like consistency. For oil-based stains (cosmetics, grease), use the powder with some water or rubbing alcohol. For water-based ones (coffee, tea), mix the powder with either hydrogen peroxide or acetone. When you have your poultice, wet the stain and apply the mixture. Tape plastic wrap over it and let dry (usually at least 24 hours); the drying process should lift the stain out.
It’s so important to keep your marble clean and polished as much as you can so that you avoid an unnecessary damage to the marble surface. Marble countertops are gorgeous additions to any home, no matter where you have marble installed – marble countertops, marble fireplaces, marble vanities, marble bathrooms, etc. – but it can get more costly than you wanted it to if you don’t practice proper marble cleaning. Marble has stood the test of time, and marble is meant to be used. But remember that a little cleaning goes a long way in maintaining the beauty and durability of marble.
While it may seem like a lot of effort to keep your marble countertops clean, polished and beautiful, caring for your marble is really very simple. It’s just learning a few important tips and tricks on how to clean marble and incorporating that advice into your normal marble cleaning routine. The above advice on how to clean marble, along with asking your marble contractor questions about caring for your marble countertops, will put you in a great position for enjoying your marble countertops for a very long time. Long live your custom marble countertops!

Engineered Quartz

Engineered Quartz

Maintaining your new quartz countertop is easy. Simply wash with a soft cloth and warm water, use a mild soap if desired. Cleansers are listed at the bottom of this page.
SPILLS
Sometimes spills occur and dry on the worktop. Materials that harden as they dry, such as gum, grease, nail polish or paint etc. should be removed by gently scraping away the residue material with a blunt plastic scraper. Then the quartz surface should be cleaned with a household vinegar/water solution (always follow the manufacturer’s dilution instructions) or with a non-abrasive cleaning pad (such as a white 3M Scotch-Brite®) together with a non-bleach, non-abrasive liquid household cleaner and rinsed thoroughly with clean water. Surface should be dried with a clean white paper towel or white cloth.
RESISTANCE TO STAINS AND CHEMICALS
Quartz countertops are non-porous, so spills and stains are not absorbed into the surface, making it stain-resistant.
Permanent markers/inks and some chemicals, solvents or dyes may, however, cause permanent discoloration to the surface and should be avoided. Should these agents come into contact with the surface, wipe up immediately and rinse with plenty of water. If the stain persists, moisten a cloth with Goo Gone®, or a comparable product and rub it into the stain. Rinse thoroughly with warm water to remove any cleaner residue.
DO NOT expose, in use or otherwise, quartz surfaces to abrasive, strong alkaline, acid, free radicals, oxidizers or the like (whether high, neutral or low pH) cleaners. Avoid exposing your tops to harsh chemicals!
DO NOT use or expose quartz surfaces to such products including, but not limited to bleach, oven cleaners, Comet®, Soft Scrub®, SOS®, products with pumice, batteries, paint removers, furniture strippers, oil soaps, tarnish or silver cleaners, or the like. DO NOT use abrasive or harsh scrub pads. DO NOT apply any sealers, penetrants or topical treatments to quartz surfaces under any circumstances. Such products will wear off and cause the gloss to appear dull or inconsistent.
HEAT RESISTANCE
Quartz countertops are heat resistant, but ARE NOT heat proof, chemical proof or fracture proof in any form. To maintain the beauty of your quartz countertop, DO NOT place hot skillets or roasting pans directly onto the surface. Also be aware of the potential damage to the surface by heat generating appliances such as electric grills or crockpots. We recommend the use of trivets and hot pads to prevent heating the top. As with any natural stone, certain exposure to heat may cause cracks due to thermal shock.
CUTS OR SCRATCHES
Quartz is one of the hardest materials in nature. That’s why your new quartz countertop will not easily scratch or chip. We do, however, recommend the use of a cutting board to protect the surface and avoid dulling your knives.
With a small amount of care, your quartz surface will look as great as the day you bought it for years to come.
ACCEPTED CLEANERS:
Clorox Anywhere, Simple Green D Pro 3 Cleaner, Clorox Anywhere (Hard Surfaces), Windex, Windex Multi-Surface Cleaner with Vinegar, Clorox Disinfecting Kitchen Cleaner, Clorox Wipes, & Formula 409 Orange Power Daily Kitchen Cleaner